If I like it, I write about it. If I don't like it, I rant. Either way I try to be witty.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from asheathes  9,618 notes

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: MEXICO

Disguised as a Mayan ruin in the jungles of Chiapas, the Mexican School for Enriched Magical Studies is a sturdy moss-covered structure blanketed by lush greenery. The students are no strangers to muggle tourists ambling about, and will often pose as fellow tourists or locals and interact with them, making them one of the most outgoing, lively, and tolerant communities in the wizarding world. For festivals, students like to don vibrant headdresses, and the school becomes a kaleidoscope of colour as girls twirl around like tops, their skirts lifting up into the air, filling empty space with colour and painting the school with embellished splendour. The campus often reverberates with music from the school’s ghost mariachi band who plays cheerfully day and night; although it tends to get annoying at times, the constant activity makes the school feel like home.
Reblogged from asheathes  30,246 notes

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: CHINA

Located in deep in the Guilin mountains, shrouded in mist and frequented by dragons that live in the multitude of winding rivers, the students of the Chinese Institute of Magic don their colourful wizarding garbs every September 1st for their return to school whereupon they are treated to spectacular opening festivities involving, but not limited to: choreographed martial arts performances from their combat professors, an assortment of acrobatic wonders, and “Mystery Mooncakes” specially made for the mid-autumn festival.
Reblogged from asheathes  22,567 notes

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: INDIA

India’s Academy of Sorcery boasts an impressive display of flashy colours, from enchanted saris that shift colours sporadically throughout the day, to the lavishly painted exterior of the academy which is situated in a nondescript location along Ganges River. Due to the frightening rate at which the school’s ancient mango tree (jokingly nicknamed “Mammoth Mango Machine”) produces mangoes, students have to endure the perpetually evolving art of mango cuisine at least five days a week. Every year, to the students’ great enjoyment, classes are halted for Diwali to make time for various competitions that take place: firework flourishes and charms for upper-year students (bonus points if it doesn’t set any part of the school on fire), and lantern designing for lower-year students (use of animals, alive or dead, is forbidden).
Reblogged from thatwetshirt  855 notes

thatwetshirt:

Simon Woods, who plays Bingley, I dyed his hair red for this film. And weirdly, it’s continued to grow red, and he resents me deeply for that. He was actually blonde. They’re [Simon Woods and Rosamund Pike] very cute together in this. I like that move of Simon’s there. He almost goes the wrong way. I like the fact the dancing isn’t perfect.
Joe Wright (Pride & Prejudice director’s commentary)